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Motorists warned to avoid M6 Junctions 3 to 2 southbound as work to clear oil spill goes on

By MIG: Leek Post and Times  |  Posted: April 08, 2014

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Motorists are being warned to avoid M6 junctions 3 to 2 southbound as they will remain closed through the evening peak period following an oil spill.

Crews are making vigorous efforts to clean a large oil spill following an accident.

A multi-vehicle incident this morning led to oil and diesel causing significant damage to the road surface and, while crews have attempted to use specialist equipment to clear the spill, it has sunk too deeply into the surface leaving it unsafe for drivers, especially motorcyclists.

Simon Foxall, Duty Operations Manager for the Highways Agency, said:

“Our teams have worked hard all morning and have tried everything they can to clean the oil and diesel from the carriageway, but it covered 400 square metres and sunk deep into the surface. Safety is always our priority and to ensure drivers will be safe along this stretch we need to resurface the road.

“We will start the work as soon as we can, but it will not be reopened until at least the early hours of tomorrow morning. It is a large task and involves removing the top layer and then relaying and allowing the new surface time to cool.

“We advise drivers to find alternative routes if possible this evening and hopefully the motorway will be fully open again tomorrow morning. We have also taken the step of cancelling planned work, which would have seen a long stretch of the M40 closed tonight, as this would have caused real issues for anyone heading from the Midlands towards the south and London.”

Road users who cannot avoid the area are advised to use the A444 south, towards Coventry, to then join the A428 via Binley. They can then join the A46 northbound, to re-join the M6 at junction 2

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